Topic: Antarctica

East Antarctic Glacier Has Contributed To Sea Level Rise

May 19, 2016
Totten

New research in Nature reveals that a massive unstable glacier in East Antarctica has contributed significantly to rising seas in the past.

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Expedition to Antarctica Will Search for Dinosaurs and More

Feb. 1, 2016
AntarcticDinos3

An international team of researchers is traveling to Antarctica to search for fossils that will reveal how life developed on the now-frozen continent after nonavian dinosaurs were wiped out. 

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East Antarctica Melting May be Explained by Oceanic Gateways

March 16, 2015

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) in the Jackson School of Geosciences have discovered two seafloor gateways that could allow warm ocean water to reach the base of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica's largest and most rapidly thinning glacier. The discovery, reported in the March 16 edition of the journal Nature Geoscience, probably explains the glacier's extreme thinning and raises concerns about how it will affect sea level rise.

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Coastal Antarctic Permafrost Melting Faster Than Expected

July 24, 2013

For the first time, scientists have documented an acceleration in the melt rate of permafrost in a section of Antarctica where the ice had been considered stable. 

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Scientists Cast Doubt on Theory of What Triggered Antarctic Glaciation

July 11, 2013

[caption id="attachment_41104" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Physiographic map of the present-day Scotia Sea, Drake Passage and adjacent land masses. The white arrows show the present path of the several branches of the deep Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) centered on its core. The area of study in the central Scotia Sea (CSS) is shown by the black box to the south of South Georgia island (SG). The volcano symbols mark the active South Sandwich volcanic arc (SSA). (WSS = western Scotia Sea; ESS = eastern Scotia Sea)"]Scotia Sea Today[/caption]

A team of U.S. and U.K. scientists has found geologic evidence that casts doubt on one of the conventional explanations for how Antarctica's ice sheet began forming. Ian Dalziel, research professor at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics and professor in the Jackson School of Geosciences, and his colleagues report the findings today in an online edition of the journal Geology.

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