Topic: Artificial intelligence

Texas Students Win IBM Watson Competition With App Expanding Access to Social Services

Jan. 16, 2015

[caption id="attachment_50010" align="alignright" width="300" caption="The University of Texas at Austin team flashes the school's "hook 'em horns" sign as they celebrate their first place win in the Watson University Competition. Held at IBM Watson headquarters in NYC, the team worked over the course of a semester to develop a Watson-based app, CallScout, that could improve citizens' access to state services. (L-R): Professor Bruce Porter, Thejas Prasad, Niko Lazaris, Matt Ebeweber, Bri Connelly, Jay Shah, Jeffrey Tang and Ken Barker, Research Staff Member, IBM Watson Group (Photo Credit: Augusto F Menezes/Feature Photo Service for IBM)"][/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  Students from The University of Texas at Austin won $100,000 in seed funding for developing an idea for a smart phone app that would use artificial intelligence to help Texas residents get information about health care, food assistance and other social services in partnership with the United Way for Greater Austin's 2-1-1 Navigation Center.

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Artificially Intelligent Game Bots Pass the Turing Test on Turing's Centenary

Sept. 26, 2012

An artificially intelligent virtual gamer created has won the BotPrize by convincing a panel of judges that it was more human-like than half the humans it competed against.

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Tower Shines Orange Tonight for UT Austin Villa Robot Soccer Team Win

June 29, 2012
Tower Shines Orange Tonight for UT Austin Villa Robot Soccer Team Win

Celebrating the UT Austin Villa Robot Soccer Team World Championships Wins in Two Divisions

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University of Texas at Austin Team Wins Robot Soccer World Championships in Two Divisions

June 28, 2012

UT Austin Villa, a team of computer science students led by professor Peter Stone, won two 2012 Robot Soccer Wor

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Computer Scientist Developing Intersections of the Future With Fully Autonomous Vehicles

Feb. 20, 2012

Intersections of the future will not need stop lights or stop signs, but will look like a somewhat chaotic flow of driverless, autonomous cars slipping past one another as they are managed by a virtual traffic controller, says computer scientist Peter Stone.

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