Topic: Chris Kirk

New Study Shows Effects of Prehistoric Nocturnal Life on Mammalian Vision

Oct. 29, 2012

Since the age of dinosaurs, most species of day-active mammals have retained the imprint of nocturnal life in their eye structures. Humans and other anthropoid primates, such as monkeys and apes, are the only groups that deviate from this pattern, according to a new study from The University of Texas at Austin and Midwestern University.

Read more

Eye Size Determined by Maximum Running Speed in Mammals

May 2, 2012

Maximum running speed is the most important variable influencing mammalian eye size other than body size, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin.

Read more

Anthropologist Discovers New Fossil Primate Species in West Texas

May 16, 2011

Physical anthropologist Chris Kirk has announced the discovery of a previously unknown species of fossil primate, Mescalerolemur horneri, in the Devil's Graveyard badlands of West Texas.

Read more

New fossil primate found in West Texas

May 16, 2011
New fossil primate found in West Texas

Take a closer look at a previously unknown species of fossil primate and a collection of images from the site where the fossil was found.

Read more

Recently Analyzed Fossil Was Not Human Ancestor as Claimed, Anthropologists Say

March 2, 2010

A fossil that was celebrated last year as a possible "missing link" between humans and early primates is actually a forebearer of modern-day lemurs and lorises, according to two papers by scientists at The University of Texas at Austin, Duke University and the University of Chicago.

In an article now available online in the Journal of Human Evolution, four scientists present evidence that the 47-million-year-old Darwinius masillae is not a haplorhine primate like humans, apes and monkeys, as the 2009 research claimed.

Read more