Topic: Climate

New Forecast Should Improve Texas Summer Drought Prediction

May 21, 2015
Texas summer rain forecast 2015

A new forecast created by UT Austin and the Texas Water Development Board should better predict summer droughts in Texas. The forecast shows a rainy summer across the state.

 

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A 3-D View of the Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on Ice History

Jan. 23, 2015

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA's Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet's potentially perilous future.

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Too Hot to Exercise? New Research Links Obesity to Temperature and Humidity

June 25, 2014

If you live in the South and have trouble exercising during the muggy summer months, you're not alone. New research by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin has found that adults are less physically active and more obese in counties where summers are hot, especially if they are also humid or rainy.

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Symbiotic Fungi Inhabiting Plant Roots Have Major Impact On Atmospheric Carbon

Jan. 8, 2014

Amanita mushroom

AUSTIN, Texas  Microscopic fungi that live in plants' roots play a major role in the storage and release of carbon from the soil into the atmosphere, according to a University of Texas at Austin researcher and his colleagues at Boston University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

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Scientists Cast Doubt on Theory of What Triggered Antarctic Glaciation

July 11, 2013

[caption id="attachment_41104" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Physiographic map of the present-day Scotia Sea, Drake Passage and adjacent land masses. The white arrows show the present path of the several branches of the deep Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) centered on its core. The area of study in the central Scotia Sea (CSS) is shown by the black box to the south of South Georgia island (SG). The volcano symbols mark the active South Sandwich volcanic arc (SSA). (WSS = western Scotia Sea; ESS = eastern Scotia Sea)"]Scotia Sea Today[/caption]

A team of U.S. and U.K. scientists has found geologic evidence that casts doubt on one of the conventional explanations for how Antarctica's ice sheet began forming. Ian Dalziel, research professor at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics and professor in the Jackson School of Geosciences, and his colleagues report the findings today in an online edition of the journal Geology.

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