Topic: Department of Neuroscience

Mutation Stops Worms From Getting Drunk

July 16, 2014

Neuroscientists at The University of Texas at Austin have generated mutant worms that do not get intoxicated by alcohol, a result that could lead to new drugs to treat the symptoms of people going through alcohol withdrawal.

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Brain Scans Show We Take Risks Because We Can't Stop Ourselves

Feb. 4, 2014

[caption id="attachment_44464" align="alignright" width="300" caption="When these brain regions (mostly associated with control) aren't active enough, we make risky choices. Z-statistic corresponds to predictive ability, yellow being the most predictive regions. Image: Sarah Helfinstein/U. of Texas at Austin."]Brain Scans Reveal Activity Associated with Risky Choices[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  A new study correlating brain activity with how people make decisions suggests that when individuals engage in risky behavior, such as drunk driving or unsafe sex, it's probably not because their brains' desire systems are too active, but because their self-control systems are not active enough.

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Three Faculty Members to Receive Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers

Jan. 8, 2014

Three faculty members from The University of Texas at Austin have been selected to receive Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their research careers.

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Grasshopper Mice Are Numb to the Pain of the Bark Scorpion Sting

Oct. 24, 2013

The painful, potentially deadly stings of bark scorpions are nothing more than a slight nuisance to grasshopper mice, which voraciously kill and consume their prey with ease. When stung, the mice briefly lick their paws and move in again for the kill.

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