Topic: Ecology

Florida Lizards Evolve Rapidly, Within 15 Years and 20 Generations

Oct. 23, 2014

[caption id="attachment_48874" align="alignright" width="240" caption="The left hind foot of the green anole after evolution. Toe pad measurements were taken on the expanded scales at the end of the longest toe. Credit: Yoel Stuart/U. of Texas at Austin"]left hind foot of the green anole[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species  in as little as 15 years  as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.

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Symbiotic Fungi Inhabiting Plant Roots Have Major Impact On Atmospheric Carbon

Jan. 8, 2014

Amanita mushroom

AUSTIN, Texas  Microscopic fungi that live in plants' roots play a major role in the storage and release of carbon from the soil into the atmosphere, according to a University of Texas at Austin researcher and his colleagues at Boston University and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute.

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Texas May Be Feeding its Red Drum Fish More Than They Need, Say Researchers

Sept. 23, 2013

[caption id="attachment_42226" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Illustration courtesy of Marianna Grenadier"][/caption]

Austin, TEXAS  It's not the chicken or the egg, but marine scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have answered a basic question about red drum fish and their eggs that may eventually help save the state of Texas a lot of money in hatcheries management and make fish farming more environmentally friendly.

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Robotic Frogs Help Turn a Boring Mating Call into a Serenade

July 15, 2013

With the help of a robotic frog, biologists at The University of Texas at Austin and Salisbury University have discovered that two wrong mating calls can make a right for female túngara frogs.

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Invasive Crazy Ants Are Displacing Fire Ants, Researchers Find

May 16, 2013

[caption id="attachment_40354" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Image courtesy of Joe MacGown, Mississippi Entomological Museum"]Nylanderia_fulva_queenhead-web[/caption]

Invasive "crazy ants" are displacing fire ants in areas across the southeastern United States, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. It's the latest in a history of ant invasions from the southern hemisphere and may prove to have dramatic effects on the ecosystem of the region.

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