Topic: Evolution

Computer Scientists at UT Austin Crack Code for Redrawing Bird Family Tree

Dec. 11, 2014

[caption id="attachment_49761" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Siavash Mirarab, computer science graduate student at The University of Texas at Austin, helped develop a new technique for estimating evolutionary relationships that allowed researchers to redraw the bird family tree."]Siavash Mirarab[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  A new computational technique developed at The University of Texas at Austin has enabled an international consortium to produce an avian tree of life that points to the origins of various bird species.

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Florida Lizards Evolve Rapidly, Within 15 Years and 20 Generations

Oct. 23, 2014

[caption id="attachment_48874" align="alignright" width="240" caption="The left hind foot of the green anole after evolution. Toe pad measurements were taken on the expanded scales at the end of the longest toe. Credit: Yoel Stuart/U. of Texas at Austin"]left hind foot of the green anole[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species  in as little as 15 years  as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.

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Walking on All Fours Is Not Backward Evolution, Study Shows

July 16, 2014

Contradicting earlier claims, "The Family That Walks on All Fours," a group of quadrupedal humans made famous by a 2006 BBC documentary, have simply adapted to their inability to walk upright and do not represent an example of backward evolution, according to new research by Liza Shapiro, an anthropologist at The University of Texas at Austin.

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New Research Revises Conventions for Deciphering Color in Dinosaurs While Suggesting Connection between Color and Physiology

Feb. 12, 2014

New research that revises recently established conventions allowing scientists to decipher color in dinosaurs may also provide a tool for understanding the evolutionary emergence of flight and changes in dinosaur physiology prior to the origin of flight.

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Bats Use Water Ripples to Hunt Frogs

Jan. 23, 2014

[caption id="attachment_44264" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Ripples continue for several seconds after a male tungara frog has stopped calling. Credit: Ryan Taylor/Salisbury University"]
Male Tungara Frog
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AUSTIN, Texas  As the male túngara frog serenades female frogs from a pond, he creates watery ripples that make him easier to target by rivals and predators such as bats, according to researchers from The University of Texas at Austin, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), Leiden University and Salisbury University.

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