Topic: Human evolution

Compared with Apes, People's Gut Bacteria Lack Diversity, Study Finds

Nov. 4, 2014

[caption id="attachment_49074" align="alignright" width="270" caption="Chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park. Photo: Ian Gilby."]Chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  The microbes living in people's guts are much less diverse than those in humans' closest relatives, the African apes, an apparently long evolutionary trend that appears to be speeding up in more modern societies, with possible implications for human health, according to a new study.

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Study Examines Potential Evolutionary Role of "Sexual Regret" in Human Survival and Reproduction

Nov. 25, 2013

In the largest, most in-depth study to date on regret surrounding sexual activity, a team of psychology researchers found a stark contrast in remorse between men and women, potentially shedding light on the evolutionary history of human nature.

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UT Austin Anthropologists Confirm Link Between Cranial Anatomy and Two-Legged Walking

Sept. 26, 2013

Anthropology researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have confirmed a direct link between upright two-legged (bipedal) walking and the position of the foramen magnum, a hole in the base of the skull that transmits the spinal cord.

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Extinct Ancient Ape Did Not Walk Like a Human, Study Shows

July 25, 2013

For decades, the movement of an ancient ape species called Oreopithecus bambolii has been a matter of debate for scientists. Did it walk like a human across its swampy Mediterranean island or did it move through the trees like other apes?

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Study Shows Persistence Pays Off in the Mating Game

Dec. 22, 2011

A new study co-authored by a University of Texas at Austin psychology professor suggests that self-deception may help men succeed in the mating game, while women will benefit more from effective communication.

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