Topic: Human health

Diet Affects Men's and Women's Gut Microbes Differently

July 29, 2014

[caption id="attachment_47101" align="alignright" width="336" caption="Illustration by Marianna Grenadier and Jenna Luecke."]Illustration by Marianna Grenadier and Jenna Luecke.[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  The microbes living in the guts of males and females react differently to diet, even when the diets are identical, according to a study by scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and six other institutions published this week in the journal Nature Communications.

Read more

Variety in Diet Can Hamper Microbial Diversity in the Gut

May 28, 2014

Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have discovered that the more diverse the diet of a fish, the less diverse are the microbes living in its gut. If the effect is confirmed in humans, it could mean that the combinations of foods people eat can influence the diversity of their gut microbes.

Read more

University of Texas Chemist Receives Major Grant to Improve Detection of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

Dec. 22, 2011

Developing a simple, paper-based test for drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is the goal of a University of Texas at Austin chemist, whose project just received a $1.6 million point-of-care diagnostics grant through Grand Challenges in Global Health, an initiative created by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Read more

Paternal Diet Can Affect Genes and Health of Offspring, Research Suggests

Dec. 23, 2010

Environmental influences experienced by a father can be passed down to the next generation, "reprogramming" how genes function in offspring, scientists at The University of Texas at Austin and the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) have discovered.

Read more

Research of Cell Movements in Developing Frogs Reveals New Twists in Human Genetic Disease

July 30, 2010

Mutations in a gene known as "Fritz" may be responsible for causing human genetic disorders such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome, University of Texas at Austin developmental biologist John Wallingford and Duke University human geneticist and cell biologist Nicholas Katsanis have found.

Read more