Topic: Institute for Geophysics

Climate Can Grind Mountains Faster Than They Can Be Rebuilt

Nov. 23, 2015
St Elias

Researchers for the first time have discovered that erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can, in the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them.

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Scientists Pioneer Method to Track Water Flowing in Glaciers

Aug. 10, 2015
Yahtse Glaciers in Alaska

New technique pioneered by UT Austin scientists is an essential step to understanding the future of the world’s largest glaciers as climate changes.

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Earthquakes in Western Solomon Islands Have Long History

June 30, 2015
UTIG researcher

Researchers have found that parts of the western Solomon Islands, a region thought to be free of large earthquakes until an 8.1 magnitude quake devastated the area in 2007, have a long history of big seismic events.

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East Antarctica Melting May be Explained by Oceanic Gateways

March 16, 2015

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) in the Jackson School of Geosciences have discovered two seafloor gateways that could allow warm ocean water to reach the base of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica's largest and most rapidly thinning glacier. The discovery, reported in the March 16 edition of the journal Nature Geoscience, probably explains the glacier's extreme thinning and raises concerns about how it will affect sea level rise.

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A 3-D View of the Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on Ice History

Jan. 23, 2015

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA's Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet's potentially perilous future.

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