Topic: Marine science

The Mystery of the Brownbanded Bamboo Shark

July 9, 2015
Divers observe a great white shark from the safety of a cage.

Sharks are splashing across TV screens all week as viewers who love (or fear) the kings of the sea are tuning into shows about the allure (or revulsion) of great whites, hammerheads, makos and more. But if you want to unravel a great shark mystery – and learn why it gives researchers hope about the future of threatened shark populations – turn off your TV and listen to what this UT student helped discover. 

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Corals Already Adapting to Global Warming, Scientists Say

June 25, 2015
A diver surveys temperature-tolerant corals in the Great Barrier Reef

Some coral populations already have genetic variants necessary to tolerate warm ocean waters, and humans can help to spread these genes, a team of scientists has found.

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Texas May Be Feeding its Red Drum Fish More Than They Need, Say Researchers

Sept. 23, 2013

[caption id="attachment_42226" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Illustration courtesy of Marianna Grenadier"][/caption]

Austin, TEXAS  It's not the chicken or the egg, but marine scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have answered a basic question about red drum fish and their eggs that may eventually help save the state of Texas a lot of money in hatcheries management and make fish farming more environmentally friendly.

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Distinguished Marine Scientist to Lead UT Austin's Marine Science Institute

July 17, 2013

Robert Dickey, a leader in areas of marine natural toxins, chemical contaminants and seafood safety, has been appointed the new director of The University of Texas at Austin's Marine Science Institute (UTMSI) in Port Aransas, Texas, and chair of the Department of Marine Science, both in the College of Natural Sciences. His appointment begins Aug. 5.

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Researchers Discover a New Way Fish Camouflage Themselves in the Ocean

June 4, 2013

Fish can hide in the open ocean by manipulating how light reflects off their skin, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. The discovery could someday lead to the development of new camouflage materials for use in the ocean, and it overturns 40 years of conventional wisdom about fish camouflage.

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