Topic: Microbiology

Anthropologists Find Clues in Ancient DNA

May 28, 2015
Rick Smith, UT Austin anthropology researcher

A new study by UT Austin anthropologists shows for the first time that epigenetic marks on DNA can be detected in a large number of ancient human remains, which may lead to further understanding about the effects of famine and disease in the ancient world.

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Compared with Apes, People's Gut Bacteria Lack Diversity, Study Finds

Nov. 4, 2014

[caption id="attachment_49074" align="alignright" width="270" caption="Chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park. Photo: Ian Gilby."]Chimpanzees in Gombe Stream National Park[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  The microbes living in people's guts are much less diverse than those in humans' closest relatives, the African apes, an apparently long evolutionary trend that appears to be speeding up in more modern societies, with possible implications for human health, according to a new study.

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Diet Affects Men's and Women's Gut Microbes Differently

July 29, 2014

[caption id="attachment_47101" align="alignright" width="336" caption="Illustration by Marianna Grenadier and Jenna Luecke."]Illustration by Marianna Grenadier and Jenna Luecke.[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  The microbes living in the guts of males and females react differently to diet, even when the diets are identical, according to a study by scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and six other institutions published this week in the journal Nature Communications.

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Variety in Diet Can Hamper Microbial Diversity in the Gut

May 28, 2014

Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and five other institutions have discovered that the more diverse the diet of a fish, the less diverse are the microbes living in its gut. If the effect is confirmed in humans, it could mean that the combinations of foods people eat can influence the diversity of their gut microbes.

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3-D Printed Microscopic Cages Confine Bacteria in Tiny Zoos for the Study of Infections

Oct. 7, 2013

By caging bacteria in microscopic houses, scientists at The University of Texas at Austin are studying how communities of bacteria, such as those found in the human gut and lungs, interact and develop infections.

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