Topic: Nanoelectronics

Nanoelectronics Center at UT Austin Receives $7.8 Million Award

June 13, 2013

The Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) awarded The University of Texas at Austin a five-year, $7.8 million nanoelectronics award.

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Graphene, the Promising "Wonder" Material for Nanoelectronics, Now Passes Heat Transfer Test

April 9, 2010

The wish list for qualities of the perfect electronic material is relatively short, among them: high electron mobility, high mechanical strength and high thermal conductivity. In the quest for smaller, faster, cheaper computers, mobile phones and other personal digital devices these traits are key.

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Faster Computers, Electronic Devices Possible After Scientists Create Large-Area Graphene on Copper

May 7, 2009

The creation of large-area graphene using copper may enable the manufacture of new graphene-based devices that meet the scaling requirements of the semiconductor industry, leading to faster computers and electronics, according to a team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin.

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Engineers Develop Method to Disperse Chemically Modified Graphene in Organic Solvents

March 30, 2009

A method for creating dispersed and chemically modified graphene sheets in a wide variety of organic solvents has been developed by a University of Texas at Austin engineering team led by Professor Rod Ruoff, opening the door to use graphene in a host of important materials and applications such as conductive films, polymer composites, ultracapacitors, batteries, paints, inks and plastic electronics.

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New Graphene-Based Material Clarifies Graphite Oxide Chemistry

Sept. 25, 2008

A new "graphene-based" material that helps solve the structure of graphite oxide and could lead to other potential discoveries of the one-atom thick substance called graphene, which has applications in nanoelectronics, energy storage and production, and transportation such as airplanes and cars, has been created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.

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