Topic: Planet

NASA Mission, Texas Astronomers Collaborate to Find Goldilocks Planet, Others

Dec. 6, 2011

NASA has announced the discovery of the first planet located in the "habitable zone" around a star the "just-right" orbit that's not too hot or too cold for water to exist in liquid form, making life as we know it possible. Astronomers from The University of Texas at Austin's McDonald Observatory involved in this and other Kepler research will present their findings at the first Kepler Science Conference this week at NASA's Ames Research Center.

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Building a better planet

April 21, 2011
Building a better planet

Our planet is vulnerable. Urbanization, population growth, natural and man-made disasters contribute to our frailty. Part of the solution to healing our planet is through sustainable building practices suited to the place, says Dean Fritz Steiner, in his new book "Design for a Vulnerable Planet."

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University of Texas at Austin Adopts Campus Sustainability Policy

May 6, 2008

The University of Texas at Austin has adopted a Campus Sustainability Policy to integrate sustainability in academic programs, operations, campus planning, administration and outreach, becoming one of the first Texas public higher education institutions to introduce such a rigorous plan, President William Powers Jr. has announced.

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Texas Astronomer Makes First Ground-Based Detection of Extra-Solar Planet Atmosphere, Using Hobby-Eberly Telescope

Dec. 5, 2007

University of Texas at Austin astronomer and Hubble Fellow Seth Redfield has used the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) at McDonald Observatory to make the first ground-based detection of the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system.

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Astronomers Discover Sun's Twin at McDonald Observatory

Nov. 9, 2007

Peruvian astronomers Jorge Melendez of The Australian National University and Ivan Ramirez of The University of Texas at Austin have discovered the best “solar twin” to date, using the 2.7-meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. Their findings suggest that the Sun’s chemical composition is not unique, as some previously thought.

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