Topic: Rong Fu

CO2 Increase Can Intensify Future Droughts in Tropics

March 13, 2015

AUSTIN, Texas  A new study suggests that increases in atmospheric CO2 could intensify extreme droughts in tropical and subtropical regions such as Australia, the southwest and central United States, and southern Amazonia at much a faster rate than previously anticipated, explains University of Texas at Austin professor Rong Fu in a commentary in the March 13 edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Risk of Amazon Rainforest Dieback is Higher Than IPCC Projects

Oct. 21, 2013

[caption id="attachment_42791" align="alignright" width="300" caption="During the 2005 and 2010 droughts, satellites detected decreased vegetation greennessor a lower Normalized Vegetation Index (NDVI)over the southern Amazon rainforest (orange and red regions). NDVI is derived from MODIS instruments on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites. Image courtesy of Ranga Myneni, Jian Bi and NASA."]
NDVI Change in Amazon During Droughts
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AUSTIN, Texas    A new study suggests the southern portion of the Amazon rainforest is at a much higher risk of dieback due to stronger seasonal drying than projections made by the climate models used in the latest report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

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Five Key Lessons (and Challenges) from the Great Texas Drought

Sept. 10, 2012
Five Key Lessons (and Challenges) from the Great Texas Drought

Scientists at UT-Austin are at the forefront of research to make the state better prepared for future water shortages. Five key lessons (and challenges) from the state's worst single-year drought in history.

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Ocean temps hint at warming trend

Nov. 16, 2010
Ginny Catania

In the seventh installment of this climate change series, the researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences consider the impact of ocean cycles on global warming.

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Rural weather stations detect warming, too

Nov. 15, 2010
Daytime thermal view of an urban heat island.

In the sixth installment of this climate change series, the urban heat island effect argument is raised. Read myth six and join the discussion.

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