Topic: Sea level

East Antarctica Melting May be Explained by Oceanic Gateways

March 16, 2015

Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) in the Jackson School of Geosciences have discovered two seafloor gateways that could allow warm ocean water to reach the base of Totten Glacier, East Antarctica's largest and most rapidly thinning glacier. The discovery, reported in the March 16 edition of the journalĀ Nature Geoscience, probably explains the glacier's extreme thinning and raises concerns about how it will affect sea level rise.

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UT Austin Scientists Will Assess Health of New York-Long Island Barrier Protection in Wake of Sandy

Jan. 9, 2013

A rapid response science team from the University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics will help map the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the beach/barrier systems off the south shore of Long Island.

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Arctic River Deltas May Hold Clues to Future Global Climate

May 15, 2009

Scientists struggling to understand how Earth's climate will change in the next few decades have neglected a potential treasure trove of information--sediments deposited in the ocean by major Arctic rivers such as the Colville and Mackenzie rivers--according to geoscientists at The University of Texas at Austin and Texas AandM University.

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Scientists Probe Antarctic Glaciers for Clues to Past and Future Sea Level

Oct. 27, 2008

Scientists from the U.S., U.K. and Australia have teamed up to explore two of the last uncharted regions of Earth, the Aurora and Wilkes Subglacial Basins, immense ice-buried lowlands in Antarctica with a combined area the size of Mexico. The research could show how Earth's climate changed in the past and how future climate change will affect global sea level.

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