Topic: The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics

Climate Can Grind Mountains Faster Than They Can Be Rebuilt

Nov. 23, 2015
St Elias

Researchers for the first time have discovered that erosion caused by glaciation during ice ages can, in the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them.

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Gas Injection Probably Triggered Small Earthquakes Near Snyder, Texas

Nov. 4, 2013

[caption id="attachment_43054" align="alignright" width="251" caption="Map showing 20092011 earthquakes located in this study (red circles), gas injection wells active since 2004 (yellow squares), and focal mechanisms for regional events (beach balls). A series of small quakes occurred in the same region in 1979 and 1980 (green circles) and may have been related to injection of water for enhanced oil recovery. Sources: EarthScope, Texas Railroad Commission, S.T. Harding, and St. Louis University. Illustration: Cliff Frohlich/University of Texas at Austin."]Earthquake and Injection Map[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas  A new study correlates a series of small earthquakes near Snyder, Texas between 2006 and 2011 with the underground injection of large volumes of gas, primarily carbon dioxide (CO2) a finding that is relevant to the process of capturing and storing CO2 underground.

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Scientists Cast Doubt on Theory of What Triggered Antarctic Glaciation

July 11, 2013

[caption id="attachment_41104" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Physiographic map of the present-day Scotia Sea, Drake Passage and adjacent land masses. The white arrows show the present path of the several branches of the deep Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) centered on its core. The area of study in the central Scotia Sea (CSS) is shown by the black box to the south of South Georgia island (SG). The volcano symbols mark the active South Sandwich volcanic arc (SSA). (WSS = western Scotia Sea; ESS = eastern Scotia Sea)"]Scotia Sea Today[/caption]

A team of U.S. and U.K. scientists has found geologic evidence that casts doubt on one of the conventional explanations for how Antarctica's ice sheet began forming. Ian Dalziel, research professor at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics and professor in the Jackson School of Geosciences, and his colleagues report the findings today in an online edition of the journal Geology.

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Scientists Image Vast Subglacial Water System Underpinning West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier

July 9, 2013

In a development that will help predict potential sea level rise from the Antarctic ice sheet, scientists from The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics have used an innovation in radar analysis to accurately image the vast subglacial water system under West Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier. They have detected a swamp-like canal system beneath the ice that is several times as large as Florida's Everglades.

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