Topic: Geology

University of Texas Geosciences Ranks Among World’s Best

April 6, 2017
JSG GEO 660

The UT Austin has one of the best geosciences research programs in the world according to two recent global rankings.

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Experiments Call Origin of Earth’s Iron into Question

Feb. 20, 2017
Earth's iron infographic

New research from The University of Texas at Austin reveals that the Earth’s unique iron composition isn’t linked to the formation of the planet’s core.

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Exceptionally Preserved Jurassic Sea Life Found

Jan. 25, 2017
Rowan Martindale with fossil slab

A trove of exceptionally preserved Jurassic marine fossils discovered in Canada, rare for recording soft-bodied species that normally don’t fossilize, is expanding scientists’ view of the rich marine life of the period.

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TexNet Seismic Monitoring Program Authorized by State

June 22, 2015
Depiction of mole tracks after an earthquake.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed legislation authorizing funding of $4.47 million for the TexNet Seismic Monitoring Program, an initiative led by the Bureau of Economic Geology — the State Geologic Survey of Texas —at UT Austin.

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Massive Geographic Change May Have Triggered Explosion of Animal Life

Nov. 3, 2014

[caption id="attachment_49037" align="alignright" width="300" caption="A new analysis from The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics suggests a deep oceanic gateway, shown in blue, developed between the Pacific and Iapetus oceans immediately before the Cambrian sea level rise and explosion of life in the fossil record, isolating Laurentia from the supercontinent Gondwanaland. Credit: Ian Dalziel"]A new analysis from The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics suggests a deep oceanic gateway, shown in blue, developed between the Pacific and Iapetus oceans immediately before the Cambrian sea level rise and explosion of life in the fossil record, isolating Laurentia from the supercontinent Gondwanaland. Credit: Ian Dalziel[/caption]

AUSTIN, Texas A paper by Ian Dalziel of The University of Texas at Austin's Jackson School of Geosciences, published in the November issue of Geology, a journal of the Geological Society of America, suggests a major tectonic event may have triggered the rise in sea level and other environmental changes that accompanied the apparent burst of life.

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