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Research on global warming to be discussed during physics department colloquium Wednesday (April 1) on UT Austin campus

Dr. Charles F. Keller, director of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will discuss “The Global Warming Debate: ‘The Heat is On'” during a physics department colloquium at 4 p.m. Wednesday (April 1) in Robert Lee Moore Hall 4.102 at The University of Texas at Austin.

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AUSTIN, Texas — Dr. Charles F. Keller, director of the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will discuss “The Global Warming Debate: ‘The Heat is On'” during a physics department colloquium at 4 p.m. Wednesday (April 1) in Robert Lee Moore Hall 4.102 at The University of Texas at Austin.

Keller’s talk will update 1995 findings of the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that said “it is very likely that humans are causing a significant portion of the warming measured over the past century.” Research since 1995, while not changing this stance, has given more credence to a solar component during the first half of this century, fueling debate on the issue.

Keller will comment on the vocal opposition to the IPCC’s report, discuss projections for further increases of carbon in the atmosphere and talk about the need for greatly accelerating research on the problem of global warming.

Keller, whose visit is sponsored by the Center for Relativity, is the lead investigator for a large multidisciplinary computational effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory to model ocean-atmosphere coupling, and to accurately predict climate changes on a variety of levels from regional to global.For more information, contact Professor Richard Matzner in the department of physics at 471-5062.