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Co-chairman of President Clinton’s High Tech Advisory Committee to discuss future federal investment in information technology

Dr. Ken Kennedy, professor of computer science at Rice University, will discuss “Federal Investment in Information Technology: A Strategy for the Future” at 2 p.m., Friday, April 17 in Main 212.

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AUSTIN, Texas — Dr. Ken Kennedy, professor of computer science at Rice University, will discuss “Federal Investment in Information Technology: A Strategy for the Future” at 2 p.m., Friday, April 17 in Main 212.

As co-chair of President Clinton’s Advisory Committee on High Performance Computing and Communications, Information Technology, and the Next Generation Internet, Kennedy’s work will influence the trajectory of information technology in the United States and help define national research agendas. “Information technology is revolutionizing our society by changing the way we work, learn, purchase and play,” he said.

One of the committee’s first tasks will be to provide guidance on the Next Generation Internet Initiative announced by Clinton in October 1996. It also will examine a wide range of issues in high performance computing, networking and related issues. The committee advises the White House through the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

The talk is being sponsored by Academic Computing and Instructional Technology Services, the Texas Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics and the Texas Telecommunications Policy Institute.

Kennedy is director of the Center for Research on Parallel Computation at Rice University and is the Ann and John Derr Professor of Computer Science. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He also is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and, in 1995, received the W. Wallace McDowell Award, the highest research award of the IEEE Computer Society.