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Electrochemist named 1998 Pauling Award Medalist

Professor Allen J. Bard, known for his pioneering work in electroanalytical chemistry, will receive the 1998 Pauling Award at ceremonies on Saturday, Nov. 21, 1998, at the University of Washington in Seattle. A scientific symposium, “Frontiers of Electrochemistry,” precedes the gold medal presentation.

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AUSTIN, Texas — Professor Allen J. Bard, known for his pioneering work in electroanalytical chemistry, will receive the 1998 Pauling Award at ceremonies on Saturday, Nov. 21, 1998, at the University of Washington in Seattle. A scientific symposium, “Frontiers of Electrochemistry,” precedes the gold medal presentation.

Bard, who holds the Hackerman-Welch Regents Chair in Chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin, has been called a “chemist for all seasons” owing to the breadth and depth of his work. His group co-discovered electrogenerated chemiluminescence, and he and his colleagues also invented and patented the scanning electrochemical microscope, a device for studying surfaces at high resolution. His achievements are said to have influenced organic, physical, polymer, solid state and analytical chemistry.

“I am honored to be among the distinguished chemists who have been previous recipients of the award and want to acknowledge the many contributions of members of my research group, students and postdoctoral fellows,” Bard said. “I also appreciate the support of the University and my colleagues in the chemistry department over the years.”

Bard was elected in 1982 to the National Academy of Sciences, and he received their prestigious “Award in Chemical Sciences” this past year. He became a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the Electrochemical Society in 1990, and won a distinguished teaching award from his home institution in 1995. All told, he has received nearly 30 medals, prizes or honors.

Bard has delivered nearly 100 named lectures around the world. His leadership roles include serving as editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Chemical Society for the past 18 years. He also recently finished a term as chair of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Chemistry Section. Bard has more than 600 research publications, has written or co-authored three books and has edited many others. He has more than 20 editorial board memberships to his credit.

Other speakers at the Pauling Award symposium will include Fred Anson, the Elizabeth W. Gilloon Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology; Royce Murray, the Kenan Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and Larry R. Faulkner, who became president of UT Austin this past April. Professors Murray and Anson are members of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Faulkner received his doctorate degree under Bard’s supervision in 1969, and co-authored with him the seminal work on electroanalytical and physical electrochemistry.

The symposium begins at 1:30 p.m. and will be followed by a reception that is open to the public. A dinner and medal presentation begins at 7 p.m., with all activities held on the University of Washington campus. The annual Pauling Award is jointly sponsored by the Puget Sound, Oregon and Portland Sections of the American Chemical Society. This year’s award chair is UW Professor Paul B. Hopkins and the symposium chair is UW Professor Martin Gouterman.

The award is named after Dr. Linus Pauling, a native of the Pacific Northwest, and the recipient of the 1954 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and the 1962 Nobel Prize in Peace. Recipients of the Pauling Award have made outstanding contributions to chemistry of a character that have merited national and international praise. Indeed, 10 of the 32 former medalists also have received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, although the Pauling Award is not given in recognition of work for which the nominee has already received the Nobel Prize. From a chemistry standpoint, there is no other meeting held on an annual basis in the Pacific Northwest that exceeds the prestige of the Pauling Award medal ceremony and symposium.

For more information, contact Nancy Cooper, UW department of chemistry, at (206) 543-4791 or send e-mail to PaulingAward@chem.washington.edu. The Pauling Award website, http://www.chem.washington.edu/paulingaward.html, will be updated continually throughout the coming months as more details are finalized.

NOTE to EDITORS: Dr. Bard can be reached at (512) 471-3761 or 471-1838. A black-and-white photo is available on request.