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Hogg Foundation announces grants for mental health research and service

The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, a unit of The University of Texas at Austin, has announced the commitment of $770,851 in grants for mental health research and service projects in Texas for the second quarter of 1999.

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AUSTIN, Texas—The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, a unit of The University of Texas at Austin, has announced the commitment of $770,851 in grants for mental health research and service projects in Texas for the second quarter of 1999.

The foundation is interested in programs that implement and evaluate innovative services designed to meet the mental health needs of Texans. While the Foundation invites proposals dealing with any aspect of mental health, priority is given to projects targeting three program areas including children and their families, youth development and minority mental health.

Grant recipients include

  • The Harris County Juvenile Probation Department, $162,071 over two years to support the implementation and evaluation of the Residential Offender Treatment Program, a sex offender treatment program at its new Burnett Bayland Reception Center.

  • A grant of $141,872 over three years to Ernest N. Jouriles, Ph.D., department of psychology at the University of Houston, to support the implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive, home-based, service program for families referred to Child Protective Services.

  • The San Jacinto Girl Scouts Inc., $108,500 over three years to implement the Acres Homes Community Project, a comprehensive community development effort to provide after-school programming for girls in partnership with Americorps, parents and area schools.

  • The Center for Public Policy Priorities, $100,000 over two years for the administrative, planning and training portions of the Texas Fragile Families Initiative, a private-public partnership dedicated to helping community-based organizations work with young, non-custodial fathers.

  • Margaret O’Brien Caughy, Ph.D., of the School of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, $83,919 over three years to evaluate the developmental, affective and behavioral variables related to the success of the Healthy Steps for Young Children program in attaining its goals.

  • A 14-month grant of $34,712 to Parents’ and Children’s Educational Project Inc. (PACE) of Austin to develop an African-American Paternal Re-engagement Program. The program would engage non-custodial African-American fathers in the lives of their children and to diminish social and policy disincentives that historically have kept these men from providing parental support.

  • Delia Saldaña, Ph.D., of the department of psychiatry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, a one-time grant of $32,709 for her study, “Brief Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy: Clinical and Cost Effectiveness in a Public Sector Population.” The research will examine the effectiveness of group clinical-behavior therapy for depressed, largely minority, individuals seeking help in public clinics.

  • Ruth McRoy, Ph.D., director of the Center for Social Work Research at The University of Texas at Austin, $28,704 for one year to support a follow-up study on how the frequency of “open adoptions” has influenced agency policies and practices.

  • Carol Schaper of the Alliance for the Mentally Ill of Collin County, $22,350 in a one-time grant to develop materials for the Social Security Benefits Training Project. The project is devoted to educating and training consumers and providers on how to access health benefits available to them under state and federal programs.

  • The Mental Health Association in Abilene Inc., a commitment of $21,784 over three years to support an elementary school suicide awareness and prevention program previously proven successful in high schools of the Abilene Independent School District.

  • The Austin Outreach and Community Service Center Inc., $20,000 in one-year support of a pilot Supper Clubs Project to help minority women build neighborhood-based social support networks as they make the transition from welfare to work.

  • A one-time grant of $6,880 to the Learning Basket Approach Program of Project Vida in El Paso to train parent educators and family support workers of the Healthy Families Program in the “Learning Basket” curriculum.

  • A one-time grant of $5,000 to Israel Cuéllar, Ph.D., of the department of psychology and anthropology at the University of Texas-Pan American for a cross-cultural research project to investigate the relationship between mental health and ethnicity in childhood and adolescence.

  • Linda Marshall, Ph.D., of the department of psychology at the University of North Texas, an eight-month supplementary grant of $2,350 to complete her study examining the effects of psychological, physical and sexual abuse on women.

For additional information, contact Jeff Patterson of the Hogg Foundation, (512) 471-5041.