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The Texas Memorial Museum celebrates new Millenium with major exhibit on billion years of Texas history

Over the course of geologic time, Texas has been home to millions of living things, from tiny, oceanic predators to the world’s largest flying reptiles. With help from UT Austin’s department of geological sciences, the Texas Memorial Museum is presenting a multimedia exploration of geologic time as recorded in the rocks of Texas.

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AUSTIN, Texas—Over the course of geologic time, Texas has been home to millions of living things, from tiny, oceanic predators to the world’s largest flying reptiles. With help from UT Austin’s department of geological sciences, the Texas Memorial Museum is presenting a multimedia exploration of geologic time as recorded in the rocks of Texas.

Waltz Across Timewill focus especially on understanding the vastness of geologic time, on the types of changes that occur over geologic time and on how scientists study these changes. With state-of-the-art technology, visitors will study past meteor strikes, volcanic eruptions and other catastrophic events, as well as various world changes that have occurred more slowly. Visitors also will see and touch real fossils that represent geologic phases in the history of Texas.

Waltz Across Timefeatures

  • unusual fossils

  • hands-on learning

  • the visitor as scientist

Waltz Across Timewill be displayed from February through December, 2000. It is offered in conjunction with Tick Tock,an exhibit for families on the concept of time at the Austin Children’s Museum in early 2000.

For more information, please contact: Brent Lyles, director of public programs, at (512) 471-3351, or sciguy@mail.utexas.edu.