UT Wordmark Primary UT Wordmark Formal Shield Texas UT News Camera Chevron Close Search Copy Link Download File Hamburger Menu Time Stamp Open in browser Load More Pull quote Cloudy and windy Cloudy Partly Cloudy Rain and snow Rain Showers Snow Sunny Thunderstorms Wind and Rain Windy Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter email alert map calendar bullhorn

Information and resources related to COVID-19


UT News

Hades in UT Austin’s human performance lab? Experiments on athletes, firefighters examine how heat affects human body after exercise

Typically, in years with successive heat waves, about 1,700 Americans die from excessive heat, as compared to about 240 deaths in normal years. Heatstroke can progress to a life-threatening stage within minutes, often without the affected individual perceiving danger.

Two color orange horizontal divider

Typically, in years with successive heat waves, about 1,700 Americans die from excessive heat, as compared to about 240 deaths in normal years. Heatstroke can progress to a life-threatening stage within minutes, often without the affected individual perceiving danger.

“You will see experienced firefighters and athletes turning red from exertion from our impending tests,” said Coyle, “but it’s important for the rest of us in normal activity to stay cool. The Red Cross often advises individuals to perform strenuous activity during the coolest part of the day — usually in the morning between 4 a.m. and 7 a.m.”

Coyle earned his Ph.D. from The University of Arizona in 1979, and was named a Fellow of the prestigious American College of Sports Medicine in 1990. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed scientific articles in scholarly journals, while also receiving more than $1 million in grants for his research. Last year, he was the keynote speaker at the 5th International Olympic Committee World Congress on Sport Sciences in Sydney, Australia.