UT Wordmark Primary UT Wordmark Formal Shield Texas UT News Camera Chevron Close Search Copy Link Download File Hamburger Menu Time Stamp Open in browser Load More Pull quote Cloudy and windy Cloudy Partly Cloudy Rain and snow Rain Showers Snow Sunny Thunderstorms Wind and Rain Windy Facebook Instagram LinkedIn Twitter email alert map calendar bullhorn

Information and resources related to COVID-19


UT News

Black holes, supernovae and the accelerating universe to be discussed at astrophysics conference hosted by UT Austin

More than 700 physicists, astronomers and cosmologists are expected to attend the Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, an international conference set for Monday (Dec. 11) through Friday (Dec. 15) at the Austin Convention Center, 500 E. Cesar Chavez.

Two color orange horizontal divider

AUSTIN, Texas—More than 700 physicists, astronomers and cosmologists are expected to attend the Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, an international conference set for Monday (Dec. 11) through Friday (Dec. 15) at the Austin Convention Center, 500 E. Cesar Chavez.

The astronomy and physics departments at The University of Texas at Austin are hosting the event, which has been held every two years since the mid-1960s, when black holes were considered purely hypothetical. Like the expanding universe, subject matter at the conference has grown to include such crucial topics in relativistic astrophysics and related fields as particle physics in the cosmos, string theory, nuclear processes in the universe and multi-dimensional cosmology.

UT Austin’s Dr. Steven Weinberg, Nobel Laureate and author of the acclaimed popular exposition of cosmology, “The First Three Minutes: A Modern View of the Origin of the Universe,” will give the summary talk on the main contributions of the conference on Friday (Dec.15). New results are expected from the Chandra and Newton X-ray observatories and the recently-launched High Energy Transient Explorer – HETE2. Other topics include the following:

Monday, Dec. 11

The Brane World – Nima Arkani-Hamed, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

Particle Dark Matter Search – Rita Bernabei, University of Rome

New Evidence for WIMPS – Blas Cabrera, Stanford University

Cosmic Background Radiation – Paolo de Bernardis, Universita La Sapienza

X-ray Background and Census of Quasars – Amy Barger, Universities of Hawaii and Wisconsin

Tuesday, Dec.12

Recent Results from Super-Kamiokande – Masayuki Nakahata, University of Tokyo

Gravitational Lensing – Genevieve Soucail, Observatoire Midi-Pyrenees

Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays – Alan Watson, University of Leeds

Black Holes in Galaxies – John Kormendy, The University of Texas at Austin

Wednesday, Dec. 13

Gamma-Ray Bursts – Shri Kulkarni, Caltech

Gamma-Ray Burst Theory – Tsvi Piran, Hebrew University

X-rays, Accretion Disks, Strong Gravity, Black Holes – Andy Fabian, Cambridge

High Energy Phenomena in Quasars – Laura Maraschi, University of Milan

Thursday, Dec. 14

Magnetars and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars – Chryssa Kouveliotou, NASA MSFC

Convection-Dominated Accretion Flows into Black Holes – Igor Igumenshchev,

Institute of Astronomy, Moscow, and Marek Abramowicz, Goteborg University, Sweden

Quintessence and Accelerating the Universe – Paul Steinhardt, Princeton University

NRC Committee Report on Physics of the Universe – Michael Turner, Chicago

Friday, Dec. 15

General Relativity – Bernd Schmidt, Albert Einstein Institute, Potsdam

The Dark Matter Crisis – Ben Moore, University of Durham

Rapporteur Summary – Steven Weinberg, The University of Texas at Austin

For more information, contact Dr. Steve Maran, 20th Texas Symposium Press Officer, at (301) 286-5154, hrsmaran@eclair.gsfc.nasa.gov or Amy Hendrick, 20th Texas Symposium Coordinator with the UT Austin astronomy department (512) 471-1305, hendrick@astro.as.utexas.edu

Reporters wishing to cover the event must register online using the registration form on the Symposium Web site http://texas-symposium.org