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LBJ School professor quoted by AP

While Hispanic tradition required a family member, usually a woman, to care for elderly parents until they die, more and more adults are juggling that responsibility with their need to work, scrambling to find balance between tradition and reality.

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While Hispanic tradition required a family member, usually a woman, to care for elderly parents until they die, more and more adults are juggling that responsibility with their need to work, scrambling to find balance between tradition and reality. “The family is central for their traditions and … older Mexican Americans say, ‘I prefer to live with my children,'” said Jacqueline Angel, a sociology professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. Often romanticized in Latin American literature, the tradition remains solid in Mexico, and immigrants to the United States typically follow it, Angel said. “It’s also becoming increasingly more challenging, because women are taking care of their own family” and working, Angel added. “Times have changed and so did the traditions.”

Associated Press
Adult Day-Care Industry Booming in South Texas
(Aug. 23)