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Law prof quoted by Associated Press

Twenty-five years ago, states began using lethal injections as a more humane way to kill death row inmates without sparks or gas, bullets or rope.

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Twenty-five years ago, states began using lethal injections as a more humane way to kill death row inmates without sparks or gas, bullets or rope. Now, amid reports that people could suffer excruciating pain and linger before death, the Supreme Court will consider whether the most common method of lethal injection the use of three drugs to sedate, relax and kill violates the Constitution’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment. Jordan Steiker, co-director of the Capital Punishment Center at the University of Texas School of Law, said a narrow ruling could accelerate the pace of executions nationwide by removing legal challenges to lethal injection. “The lethal injection issue has been the dominant legal issue over the past several years in dictating whether executions will go forward,” Steiker said.

Associated Press
Supreme Court to Consider Use of Lethal Injection
(Sept. 26)