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MEDIA ADVISORY: “Struggle for Justice” Exhibit Opens Friday

“Struggle for Justice: Four Decades of Civil Rights Photography” at the Briscoe Center for American History at UT Austin features photographs that show the flashpoints of the civil rights movement.

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WHAT: The Briscoe Center for American History at The University of Texas at Austin proudly presents “Struggle for Justice: Four Decades of Civil Rights Photography,” which features nearly 60 photographs taken between the 1930s and 1970s that show the flashpoints of the civil rights movement.

WHEN: From Nov. 10. The Briscoe Center is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

MEDIA: There will be a media availability with curator’s tours from 9 to 11 a.m. and 2 to 4 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 10. Closed Saturday, Nov. 11. Advanced media availability on Nov. 8 and 9 by request.

WHERE: The Briscoe Center, located in Sid Richardson Hall Unit 2 on the east side of The University of Texas at Austin campus (adjacent to the LBJ Presidential Library).

BACKGROUND: The Briscoe Center underwent a $7 million renovation in 2016-17. “Struggle for Justice” is on display in the center’s newly renovated exhibit gallery.

“Struggle for Justice: Four Decades of Civil Rights Photography” is an exhibit that features images from the center’s vast photojournalism collections and provides compelling visual evidence of the struggles and achievements of the civil rights movement — from Jim Crow to Black Power.

“The images on display are compelling, beautiful, disturbing and encouraging — just like the history they document,” said Don Carleton, executive director of the Briscoe Center. “Like those who marched, protested and organized for civil rights, photojournalists put themselves in great danger. The exhibit unashamedly celebrates their legacy.”

The exhibit showcases photographs that include those by Spider Martin, Flip Schulke, Charles Moore and R.C. Hickman. “Struggle for Justice” emphasizes the perspective of the photographers and focuses on five areas — signs of segregation; organizations and leaders of the civil rights movement; the risks and threat of violence that civil rights activists faced from their fellow Americans; marches and protests; and a section that documents the contemporary achievements of the civil rights movement.